Is a bath worth more than a shower?

Is a bath worth more than a shower?

Are you thinking of renovating your bathroom and replacing the bathtub with a shower, but you are hesitating for fear that your property will be devalued? The answer from the Professional Association of Real Estate Brokers of Quebec (APCIQ) is clear, but nevertheless…

Posted yesterday at 12:00 pm

Emmanuelle Mozayan-Verschaeve

Emmanuelle Mozayan-Verschaeve
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Marc Lacasse, real estate broker and president of the APCIQ, wants to point out that renovating a bathroom always adds value to a home. “It produces a surprise effect when a potential buyer visits a property, which will facilitate the sale. If there is no shower, you will see that as a weakness and may offer less when you bid to install one to cover the cost.

“That said, it’s important to maintain at least one bathroom with a bathtub,” he thinks.


PHOTO CREDIT BY APCIQ

Marc Lacasse, real estate broker and president of the Professional Association of Real Estate Brokers of Quebec (APCIQ)

People without a bath tend to prefer a shower when they renovate, but they risk losing significant market share, especially for young families, who need a bathtub for the kids.

Marc Lacasse, real estate broker and president of the Professional Association of Real Estate Brokers of Quebec

The broker also points out that many people like to take a bath from time to time in winter to warm up and that, depending on their physical condition, most older people will prefer the bath to the shower, to which they will add bars of support for. to help them get in and out. So according to him, if the absence of a bathtub does not really devalue the value of the property, it may encourage a buyer to lower the sale price to offset the cost of the work if he wants to install one.

Identify your needs

For her part, interior designer Sophie Tremblay of ST Design has noticed a craze for large showers in the last two years. Her clients often ask her to assess the impact on their property value if they remove the bathroom. “I think that people are more aware of things, so they question themselves and prefer to invest in what they actually use,” she says.


PHOTO PROVIDED BY SOPHIE TREMBLAY

Sophie Tremblay, Interior Designer at ST Design

The bathtub is made for relaxation, not for washing. Some have spas for that, so they don’t see the point in keeping a tub that will be used twice a year.

Sophie Tremblay, Interior Designer at ST Design

She points out that it takes an average of $3,000 for a freestanding bathroom and its faucets and that people prefer to invest in a large 4′ x 6′ shower and then add a heated floor to maximize their comfort in the bathroom.

The designer also has requests from seniors for large shower projects. “They want to improve accessibility, but they don’t want a bathroom with a door. I add a bench for them to sit on and an alcove to store hygiene products at the right height,” he explains.

Thinking of reselling… or not

It is clear that if you are lucky enough to have two bathrooms, it is better to install a bathtub in one of them and a shower in the other, or combine them if space allows. If you only have one bathroom and want to resell your property quickly, opt for a bathtub to cater to a larger share of the buyer market. On the other hand, if you plan to stay there for a long time, choose the solution that really meets your own needs.

“Don’t hesitate to treat yourself if you want to stay in your home for more than 10 years by replacing the bathtub with a shower, as well as creating a very daring decoration that will make you happy”, advises Marc Lacasse.

For the more cautious, Sophie Tremblay offers a wise solution: “Choose a shower whose floor drain matches that of the bathtub. This will be a selling point if the buyer wants to deliver a bathtub as it will be easy to install. »

Two examples

  • Before

    PHOTO PROVIDED BY SOPHIE TREMBLAY, ST DESIGN

    Before

  • After

    PHOTO PROVIDED BY SOPHIE TREMBLAY, ST DESIGN

    After

1/two

In this small 74 in. by 80 in. (188 cm by 203 cm) bathroom, designer Sophie Tremblay of ST Design installed a 48 in. by 30 in. (122 cm by 76 cm) shower equipped with a retractable bench instead. of the bathtub that took up a lot of space. Her older clients didn’t want a bathroom with a door and needed storage. The location of the toilet and sink has not changed, but the designer chose a vanity to add storage space. The medicine cabinet’s narrow mirror also includes shelves, handy for storing small accessories. In addition, a sliding door to access the bathroom and the new distribution have freed up space to install a cabinet in the extension of the shower. Owners love this more functional space whose soft color palette creates an effect of grandeur and warmth.

  • Before

    PHOTO PROVIDED BY SOPHIE TREMBLAY, ST DESIGN

    Before

  • Before

    PHOTO PROVIDED BY SOPHIE TREMBLAY, ST DESIGN

    Before

  • After

    PHOTO PROVIDED BY SOPHIE TREMBLAY, ST DESIGN

    After

  • After

    PHOTO PROVIDED BY SOPHIE TREMBLAY, ST DESIGN

    After

1/4

This bathroom had a huge bathtub, a small corner shower, and a sink, which didn’t suit designer Sophie Tremblay’s clients, a blended family with four children. “They needed two vanities to be together without getting in the way and a shower with two heads. I replaced the shower stall with a vanity moved from the first one and put in a full size shower instead of the tub to avoid touching the pipes too much. » Large modern black and white tiles give the room an elegant feel, while the wood finish on the furniture adds warmth.


#bath #worth #shower

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