Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro review: Great, but not perfect

Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro review: Great, but not perfect


A good design, several unique software features, above-average battery life, a more affordable price than some competitors: Google’s new Android phones have a lot to offer. As long as you’re not looking for the cream of the crop.

Proven design and features

After evolving its design from generation to generation for its first Pixel phones (and even previous Nexus), Google is taking a break this year. For the first time, the new Pixels look a lot like their predecessors.

Oh, there are a lot of little changes here and there, like a new (still nice) metal frame around the lenses, slightly relocated buttons (just enough that you can’t reuse a Pixel 6 case), and new colors, but overall the design is very similar this year to last year.


Photo: Maxime Johnson.

The Pixel 7 Pro comes with new colors and a new metal band around the camera, but its design resembles last year’s Pixel 6 Pro.

Even when it comes to components, the Pixel 7 looks similar to the Pixel 6. Its Tensor G2 processor is more powerful than last year’s G1, but its 50-megapixel main camera sensor is the same. The Pixel 7’s display is brighter and sturdier than the Pixel 6’s, but otherwise they’re virtually identical.

Does that offend me? Not really. Hardly anyone changes their phone every year, and year-over-year technology improvements aren’t what they used to be. It must also be said that the design of the Pixel 7 is beautiful, and that its components are good. The 7 Pro’s QHD+ OLED display, for example, is sharp and bright, and supports adaptive display up to 120Hz. So everything is smooth as desired (and the Pixel 7’s display, at 90Hz, is not bad either).

Its processor also offers all the necessary power, and its autonomy is sensational. With the Pixel 7 Pro, I easily get two full days on a single charge, while the iPhone 14 Pro barely makes it to the end of the day.

I’m a bit against the grain of the market in general, but personally my only problem with the devices is their form factor. The Pixel 7 Pro, in particular, is a bit too big for my liking, with its 6.7-inch screen making it difficult for us to use it safely and access the top of the screen with one hand.

Various interesting software tools

The Anti-Blur (Photo Unblur) tool could allow you to recover failed photos.

Photo: Maxime Johnson.

The Anti-Blur (Photo Unblur) tool could allow you to recover failed photos.

One of the biggest strengths of the new Pixels (and the Pixel lineup as a whole) is their access to many exclusive Google tools and software. Some are exclusive to the Pixel 7, while others will be offered to older models as well.

Google’s audio note-taking software, for example, offers excellent text transcription technology, and new Pixels will soon be entitled to a free VPN. The Pixel 7 also offers for the first time since the Pixel 4 the Face Unlock tool, which unlocks the phone using facial recognition. In a week, I almost never had to use my fingerprints, the recognition is very fast and efficient.

Another new thing to note is that Google Photos on the Pixel 7 has the Photo Unblur tool, which removes the blur of a face in a photo, regardless of whether it was taken with the Pixel or 20 years ago. . The tool is fine, but here you’ll have to limit your expectations: photos that are too blurry won’t magically lighten again, only slightly off-kilter ones can be corrected. In my photo library, however, adapted images were rare.

Photos: a good camera, but falling behind

The Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro cameras offer many features (night mode, motion mode, cinema mode, etc.) and allow you to take great photos.

Photos: Maxime Johnson.

The Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro cameras offer many features (night mode, motion mode, cinema mode, etc.) and allow you to take great photos.

Speaking of photos, the new Pixel’s cameras are pretty good overall, but don’t call the Guinness World Records Guide just yet.

These offer a good number of features, like a new cinematic mode (the equivalent of portrait mode, but in video) and great night shots. Their digital zoom is also above average and they take great portraits. In the case of the Pixel 7 Pro, we also appreciate its new 5X zoom and improved wide-angle lens. The difference is noticeable compared to the Pixel 6 Pro.

The Pixel 7 Pro offers one more telephoto lens than the Pixel 7 and its wide-angle lens is larger, but both models have the same main camera.

Photo: Maxime Johnson.

The Pixel 7 Pro offers one more telephoto lens than the Pixel 7 and its wide-angle lens is larger, but both models have the same main camera.

The iPhone 14 Pro (right) has faithfully reproduced the color of the doll's dress here.  Not the Pixel 7 Pro (left).

Photo: Maxime Johnson.

The iPhone 14 Pro (right) has faithfully reproduced the color of the doll’s dress here. Not the Pixel 7 Pro (left).

Anyone who upgrades their old phone to a new Pixel will be mesmerized by its photo quality and features. That said, I have an iPhone 14 Pro at home, and in the comparison game, Google’s device often falls short. A portrait when the brightness is not perfect, for example, will have much more noise with the Google device, and sometimes the color management of the Pixel 7 is missing.

There is nothing unacceptable about it, but the difference is big enough to be noticed often and with the naked eye. Obviously, to paraphrase Plato, if you don’t have an iPhone 14 Pro at home, you won’t know your photos could be better, and you’ll enjoy your experience.

An increasingly promising ecosystem

In 2022, Google is finally getting serious about its ecosystem, with the launch of the Pixel Watch and Pixel Buds Pro in particular.

Photo: Maxime Johnson.

In 2022, Google is finally getting serious about its ecosystem, with the launch of the Pixel Watch and Pixel Buds Pro in particular.

In a way, the biggest news this year for the Pixel 7 isn’t so much the phones themselves, but everything around them. Google relies more and more on the Pixel ecosystem.

The Pixel 7, the new Pixel Watch and the Pixel Buds Pro headphones are already perfectly integrated. Google’s new Nest Wi-Fi Pro routers with Wi-Fi 6E (arguably the prettiest routers on the market) take advantage of the Wi-Fi 6E chip in the new phones, and a Pixel tablet will be added to the ecosystem next year.

Obviously, we’re still a long way from the Apple and Samsung ecosystems, which have a greater variety of interoperable devices to offer (think tracking devices like AirTags and Galaxy SmartTags, for example). Let’s also hope that these new add-on products from Google don’t suffer the fate of Stadia in a few years.

Which model to choose?

The Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro phones.

Photo: Maxime Johnson.

The Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro phones.

The Pixel 7 Pro ($1,179) and the Pixel & ($799) are more alike than they are different. As well as having a better display, bigger battery, and better secondary cameras, the Pixel 7 Pro has 12GB of RAM instead of 8GB, and that’s about it. Personally, to save $380, I’d go for the smaller of the two models, which offer exceptional value for money.

If the 120Hz screen is important to you, if you’re a fan of telephoto lenses and prefer a larger format, the Pixel 7 Pro is also a good option at a good price.

We love

  • The many features of the camera.
  • The free VPN.
  • Exceptional autonomy.
  • Its good price, compared to the competition.

we love less

  • The main camera could be improved.
  • You have to get the big phone to get the best features.
  • Google is starting to take its ecosystem seriously, but there is still a long way to go.


#Pixel #Pixel #Pro #review #Great #perfect

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *